Reducing Costs by Analyzing Records

Reducing Costs by Analyzing Records

 Increasing profits through cost reduction must be based on the concept of an organized, planned program. Unless adequate records are maintained through a proper accounting system, there can be no basis for ascertaining and analyzing costs. One of the key values in having good record keeping (especially financial) is in reducing costs by analyzing records generated by the systems you have developed – No GIGO.

 Cost reduction is not simply attempting to slash any and all expenses unmethodically. The owner-manager must understand the nature of expenses and how expenses inter-relate with sales, inventories, cost of goods sold, gross profits, and net profits.

 Cost reduction does not mean only the reduction of specific expenses.

 You can achieve greater profits through more efficient use of the expense dollar. Some of the ways you do this are by increasing the average sale per customer,  by getting a larger return for your advertising and sales promotion dollar, and by improving your internal methods and procedures.

 Remember…. “A large and increasing sales volume often creates the appearance of prosperity while behind-the-scene expenses are eating up the profit.”

 Paying The Right Price

Your goal should be to pay the right price for prosperity. Determining that price for your operation goes beyond knowing what your expenses are. Reducing expenses to increase profit requires you to obtain the most efficient use of the expense dollar.

 

Look, for example, at the payroll expense.

 An understanding of the worth of each expense item comes from experience and an analysis of records. Adequate records tell what has happened. Their analyses provide facts, which can help you, set realistic goals, you are paying the right price for your operation’s prosperity.

 

Analyze Your Expenses

Sometimes you cannot cut an increase item. But you can get more from it and thus increase your profits. In analyzing your expenses, you should use percentages rather than actual dollar amounts.

 For example, if you increase sales and keep the dollar amount of an expense the same, you have decreased that expense as a percentage of sales. When you decrease your cost percentage, you increase your percentage of profit.

 On the other hand, if your sales volume remains the same, you can increase the percentage of profit by reducing a specific item of expense. Your goal, of course, is to do both: to decrease specific expenses and increase their productive worth at the same time.

 Before you can determine whether cutting expenses will increase profits, you need information about your operation. This information can be obtained only if you have an adequate recordkeeping system. Such records will provide the figures to prepare a profit and loss statement (preferably monthly for most retail businesses), a budget, break-even calculations, and evaluations of your operating ratios compared with those of similar types of business.

 Break-even

A useful method for making expense comparisons is break-even analysis. Break-even is the point at which gross profit equals expenses. In a business year, it is the time at which your sales volume has become sufficient to enable your over-all operation to start showing a profit.

 Once your sales volume reached the break-even point, your fixed expenses are covered. Beyond the break-even point, every dollar of sales should earn you an equivalent additional profit percentage.

 It is important to remember that once sales pass the break-even point, the fixed expenses percentage goes down as the sales volume goes up. Also the operating profit percentage increases at the same rate as the percentage rate for fixed expenses decreases – provided, of course, that variable expenses are kept in line

Leave a Reply